Fitting Instructions


Failure To Follow Our Instructions Will Void Guarantee

  • 1You must first find the cause of the original turbo failure before fitting replacement

Most turbo failures are due to either lubrication (oil), electronic units, foreign matter entering the compressor housing, or air leaks over speeding the turbo.

  • 2You must replace these items with new parts
    • Oil + Oil filter (as to manufactures recommendation)
    • Air filter
    • Gaskets + Washers
    • Particulate filter (exhaust system) ~ OPTIONAL
    • E.G.R. Valve ~ OPTIONAL
  • 3CHECK and CLEAN the following (Replace if necessary)
    • Oil cooler / intercooler and pipe (no damage or air leak) GET PRESSURE TESTED
    • Breather system (ensure no blockage)
    • Turbo oil drain pipe (make sure it’s clear / no damage to pipe)
    • OIL PRESSURE MUST BE WITHIN MANUFACTURES TOLARANCES
    • Ensure the exhaust and/or catalytic converter are not fully or partly blocked
  • 4Fitting and running of turbo
    • Fill turbo inlet with oil and prime turbo by hand
    • DO NOT USE ANY JOINTING COMPOUND ON ANY PART OF THE TURBO
    • Crank engine until oil streams out of turbo oil feed pipe before fitting turbo
    • After fitting turbo, crank engine for 30 sec to build oil pressure to turbo
    • Let engine idle for 3-5 mins before driving
    • CHECK FOR OIL LEAKS OR GASKET LEAKS or AIR LEAKS ANYWHERE ON THE ENGINE

PLEASE CHECK POPULAR ELECTRONIC FAULTS : (a) diesel pump sensor (which controls the actuator)
(b) mass air flow sensor + wire meshing (c) manifold pressure sensor and damaged wiring
Or any other electrical faults, all faults should be removed before test drive

ALL BMW – MUST REPALCE THE BREATHER BLOCK ON CAM COVER

CHECK DIESEL INJECTOR’S FOR DAMAGE ON THE SPRAY TIP (BROKEN)

The Importance of Asking Why?

Replacing a failed turbo is not just about ‘how’- how do I remove and refit a replacement turbo or even ‘what’- what is wrong with the turbo, it is also and arguably the most important, about asking ‘why’- why did the turbo fail.

Failure to ask this question can lead to a very expensive learning curve, – disgruntled customers, unproductive workshop space and inevitably the question of who pays if the replacement turbo fails prematurely. The reason that asking ‘why’ is so important, especially where turbochargers are concerned is the fact they rely on the engine being in good working order for its longevity, it is not just a bolt on stand alone component such as an alternator or starter motor, it depends on the engine for lubrication, the integrity of the exhaust gasses to drive the impellor and the cleanliness of the intake air feeding the compressor.
It is doubtful that a head gasket or cracked cylinder head would be replaced without consideration of reason ‘why – is the cooling system faulty? Are the surfaces warped? Has a cylinder liner dropped?

Clearly it is not possible or practical to ascertain the reason beyond doubt in every case however in many cases obvious causes are often over looked causing grief for all concerned, some examples are:

Citroen C3/C4, Ford Fiesta, Fusion, Peugeot 206/207/307/407, Fiat Scudo.
Part Numbers 753420-4, 49173-07502/07503/07504/07505/ 07506/07507 with engine codes: DV6TED4/ DV6UTED have a habit of blocking or restricting not only the turbo oil feed pipe, oil drain pipe and fittings with carbon but also the oil pump pick up strainer, which leads to premature failure due to oil starvation. Simply by noting the carbon build up in the oil feed pipe, fittings and the turbo inlet port would indicate that further investigation was needed before a replacement unit is fitted.
Carbon deposits can be caused by – short-distance driving, poor oil/fuel grade, high mileage, service intervals too long and worn engine.

Examples of carbon deposits within the oil feed inlets

Example of carbon deposit (1)
Example of carbon deposit (2)

Trouble Shooting Flowchart

Download Trouble Shooting Flowchart